About Rosetta

Also known as “Rosetta”, Rasheed sits on the western arm of the Nile. Settled since the 9th-century, it was once one of Egypt’s most important port towns and now boasts a collection Ottoman mansions and bustling souqs.

Things to do

House of Amasyali is the city's most impressive building, adorned with intricate lattice windows, sparkling lantern lights and a patterned red, black and white facade. Next door is House of Abu Shaheen, which features a sun-dappled courtyard and gleaming granite columns.

Fort of Qaitbay sits to the north of Rasheed and has guarded the mouth of the Nile since 1479. It's best known as the site where the Rosetta Stone was found, with a small historical exhibition paying homage to the ancient Egyptian tablet and its famous hieroglyphs. The fort also offers sweeping views over the Nile.

Set off the main square, the Rachid Museum is housed in an elegant Ottoman house. The ground floor features a copy of the Rosetta Stone, while the first floor offers a glimpse at life during the Ottoman Empire. You can also check out displays on how locals defended themselves during the British occupation.

In addition to residential homes, Rasheed's Ottoman houses were also used as public buildings. At Hammam Azouz you can peer into a grand bathhouse once used by wealthy merchants. It's been beautifully restored to its former grandeur, with gleaming marble floors, bubbling fountains and intricate tilework.

Getting around

Rasheed's historic district is easy to navigate on foot and the city is well-serviced by a network of taxis and local buses. Regular mini buses run to Alexandria in around one hour.